35
Views

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has warned the Chinese government to learn the lessons of Russia’s “strategic failure” in Ukraine

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 35 views • 2022-06-29 00:40 • added this tag no more than 24h

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has warned the Chinese government to learn the lessons of Russia’s “strategic failure” in Ukraine, as he heads to Europe for a meeting of NATO leaders.

In an interview with the Australian Financial Review, conducted en route to Spain for the NATO meeting, Albanese said the Ukraine invasion had brought democratic nations together, “whether they be members of NATO, or non-members such as Australia.”

When asked what message the Chinese government should take from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, particularly for its ambitions toward Taiwan, Albanese said the war “had shown attempts to impose change by force on a sovereign country meet resistance.” view all
Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese has warned the Chinese government to learn the lessons of Russia’s “strategic failure” in Ukraine, as he heads to Europe for a meeting of NATO leaders.

In an interview with the Australian Financial Review, conducted en route to Spain for the NATO meeting, Albanese said the Ukraine invasion had brought democratic nations together, “whether they be members of NATO, or non-members such as Australia.”

When asked what message the Chinese government should take from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, particularly for its ambitions toward Taiwan, Albanese said the war “had shown attempts to impose change by force on a sovereign country meet resistance.”
54
Views

it would be interesting to compare the current falls in New Zealand housing prices with those of the U.S housing crash from the time America entered recession in Dec 2007

nz news wrote the post • 0 comments • 54 views • 2022-06-07 14:58 • added this tag no more than 24h

it would be interesting to compare the current falls in New Zealand housing prices with those of the U.S housing crash from the time America entered recession in Dec 2007. Price falls nationally Ex-Auckland are actually pretty similar. Auckland/Wellington much faster.
  view all
it would be interesting to compare the current falls in New Zealand housing prices with those of the U.S housing crash from the time America entered recession in Dec 2007. Price falls nationally Ex-Auckland are actually pretty similar. Auckland/Wellington much faster.
 
48
Views

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Arden leaving the offices of BlackRock

nz news wrote the post • 0 comments • 48 views • 2022-06-07 14:31 • added this tag no more than 24h

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Arden leaving the offices of BlackRock. Absolutely nothing to see here whatsoever.
 

  view all
New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Arden leaving the offices of BlackRock. Absolutely nothing to see here whatsoever.
 

 
76
Views

Wechat Verification Telegram Group For Free

Corinne wrote the post • 0 comments • 76 views • 2022-05-24 19:01 • added this tag no more than 24h

WeChat telegram group for foreigners who wanna sign up wechat account.

I thought to create a group where we can help each other out as Foreigners for this wechat app. A lot of us are getting QR code verification for various reasons where we have no control over and it is almost impossible to get it back unless you have friends who also have WeChat accounts.

I made a Telegram group so if I can get people in here as friends, we can help each other to get our account verified.

https://t.me/+gjYHhzWl7PYyY2I0



P.S. I also have a wechat account. There will be ABSOLUTELY no money transactions here, this is a group where I hope that we can assist each other and not asking money. This Wechat account Verification Telegram Group is for verifying wechat account for free.Don't ask money for wechat verification . Post your latest wechaht sign up  QR code in this group. Let's help each other. view all
WeChat telegram group for foreigners who wanna sign up wechat account.

I thought to create a group where we can help each other out as Foreigners for this wechat app. A lot of us are getting QR code verification for various reasons where we have no control over and it is almost impossible to get it back unless you have friends who also have WeChat accounts.

I made a Telegram group so if I can get people in here as friends, we can help each other to get our account verified.

https://t.me/+gjYHhzWl7PYyY2I0



P.S. I also have a wechat account. There will be ABSOLUTELY no money transactions here, this is a group where I hope that we can assist each other and not asking money. This Wechat account Verification Telegram Group is for verifying wechat account for free.Don't ask money for wechat verification . Post your latest wechaht sign up  QR code in this group. Let's help each other.
69
Views

Universities in Australia without IELTS in 2022

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 69 views • 2022-05-24 07:36 • added this tag no more than 24h

Universities in Australia without IELTS in 2022 
 1. The University of South Australia 
2. Macquarie University 
3. The University of Adelaide 
4. The University of Queensland 
5. Bond University 
6. The University of Southern Queensland 
PS: Australia has tons of scholarships! view all
Universities in Australia without IELTS in 2022 
 1. The University of South Australia 
2. Macquarie University 
3. The University of Adelaide 
4. The University of Queensland 
5. Bond University 
6. The University of Southern Queensland 
PS: Australia has tons of scholarships!
59
Views

This map shows how Melbourne voted

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 59 views • 2022-05-24 07:21 • added this tag no more than 24h

What an extraordinary map of Melbourne from the Sunday Age. The Liberal Party all but wiped out。
 

 
  view all
What an extraordinary map of Melbourne from the Sunday Age. The Liberal Party all but wiped out。
 

 
 
71
Views

Marcos Jr is in Naarm/Melbourne, Australia,Join us! Oppose the Marcos-Duterte tandem!

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 71 views • 2022-05-24 07:18 • added this tag no more than 24h

Marcos Jr is in Naarm/Melbourne, Australia. We are out here waiting for him to tell him that he's not welcome here. Join us! Oppose the Marcos-Duterte tandem!
 

 
  view all
Marcos Jr is in Naarm/Melbourne, Australia. We are out here waiting for him to tell him that he's not welcome here. Join us! Oppose the Marcos-Duterte tandem!
 

 
 
56
Views

This is what’s wrong with football in Australia

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 56 views • 2022-05-24 07:10 • added this tag no more than 24h

This is what’s wrong with football in this country.

15 year old kid falls over the fence after a goal is scored and this is the treatment. Fucking Pathetic
 

  view all
This is what’s wrong with football in this country.

15 year old kid falls over the fence after a goal is scored and this is the treatment. Fucking Pathetic
 

 
75
Views

John Howard has launched a scathing election attack on Labor leader Anthony Albanese

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 75 views • 2022-05-09 08:36 • added this tag no more than 24h

John Howard has launched a scathing election attack on Labor leader Anthony Albanese, saying “nobody has gone to an election so policy-light as this bloke.” Read the full interview here: https://bit.ly/39M90Xd
  view all
John Howard has launched a scathing election attack on Labor leader Anthony Albanese, saying “nobody has gone to an election so policy-light as this bloke.” Read the full interview here: https://bit.ly/39M90Xd
 
69
Views

Apply University of Adelaide Australian Government Scholarship 2022

adelaidenow wrote the post • 0 comments • 69 views • 2022-05-09 08:21 • added this tag no more than 24h

University of Adelaide Australian Government Scholarship 2022. 
 
Details Here: https://bit.ly/3LQwoRh 
 
Benefits: 
[1] A living allowance of AUD28,854 per annum 
[2] Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) World care policy 
[2] Relocation and publication expenses. 
 
Deadline : 5 June 2022.
  view all
University of Adelaide Australian Government Scholarship 2022. 
 
Details Here: https://bit.ly/3LQwoRh 
 
Benefits: 
[1] A living allowance of AUD28,854 per annum 
[2] Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) World care policy 
[2] Relocation and publication expenses. 
 
Deadline : 5 June 2022.
 
67
Views

Scientists have glued themselves to Santos HQ in Adelaide.

adelaidenow wrote the post • 0 comments • 67 views • 2022-05-09 08:17 • added this tag no more than 24h

Scientists have glued themselves to Santos HQ in Adelaide. They're also glued to Flinders street blocking traffic in front of Santos. They're demanding an immediate halt to all new oil and gas exploration, mining and production. It's time to listen to the experts!
 

  view all
Scientists have glued themselves to Santos HQ in Adelaide. They're also glued to Flinders street blocking traffic in front of Santos. They're demanding an immediate halt to all new oil and gas exploration, mining and production. It's time to listen to the experts!
 

 
87
Views

About 1000 people supporting pro-life choices and anti-abortion policies marched through Brisbane on Saturday

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 87 views • 2022-05-03 11:42 • added this tag no more than 24h

Senator Amanda Stoker, the federal government’s assistant minister for women, promoted her stand against abortions to around 1000 people at a pro-life rally in Brisbane on Saturday.
 
Senator Amanda Stoker, the federal government’s assistant minister for women, promoted her stand against abortions to around 1000 people at a pro-life rally in Brisbane on Saturday.

“It really does baffle me why there are some people who have questioned whether it is appropriate for a person like me to serve as assistant minister for women because I am pro-life,” Stoker said. “They suggest there is some sort of conflict between those two roles.

 
“But in my mind, there is absolutely no conflict possible between supporting women and supporting the most vulnerable people in our community.”

Stoker said it was clear that some women faced conflicts in their pregnancies and were forced to terminate them.

“But we should be providing care and support for those women, so they know that terminating their pregnancy is not their only option,” she said.

Stoker was one of three Queensland senators to speak at the now annual pro-life rally in Brisbane: fellow LNP senator Matt Canavan and One Nation senator Malcolm Roberts also spoke. Retiring Dawson MP George Christensen was invited by Cherish Life Queensland.
 
Police said about 1000 people crowded into Speakers’ Corner outside Parliament House in George Street before marching around the inner city.

Cherish Life Queensland claims to be non-political, but people at the rally were encouraged to place Labor and The Greens last when they vote at the May 21 federal elections.

In an outspoken address, Stoker described as “madness” the skilled training given to doctors – “so they might heal” – for them to subsequently end pregnancies in hospitals.

“It is just wrong that our society seems to be more ready to condemn cruelty against a dog or a cat than it is a human child, even one that is old enough to be capable of life outside the womb.”

National Party senator Canavan, who is a member of Cherish Life Queensland, told reporters last week the federal government’s net zero carbon emission policy was “dead”, only to be severely rebuked by senior Nationals and Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

Canavan said Christians “rose up” at the 2019 federal election against moves by former ALP leader Bill Shorten.

“He would have been prime minister if it wasn’t for a lot of us [Christians],” he said.

“Christians and other faith members got up and voted against the Labor Party in droves. Now the Labor Party is a little bit wary of Christians. They are a little bit scared of us.”

Canavan said he would introduce a private member’s bill to prohibit the Medicare rebate for abortions where a person decides to end a pregnancy after learning the gender of the unborn child is not what they wished.
 
  view all
Senator Amanda Stoker, the federal government’s assistant minister for women, promoted her stand against abortions to around 1000 people at a pro-life rally in Brisbane on Saturday.
 
Senator Amanda Stoker, the federal government’s assistant minister for women, promoted her stand against abortions to around 1000 people at a pro-life rally in Brisbane on Saturday.

“It really does baffle me why there are some people who have questioned whether it is appropriate for a person like me to serve as assistant minister for women because I am pro-life,” Stoker said. “They suggest there is some sort of conflict between those two roles.

 
“But in my mind, there is absolutely no conflict possible between supporting women and supporting the most vulnerable people in our community.”

Stoker said it was clear that some women faced conflicts in their pregnancies and were forced to terminate them.

“But we should be providing care and support for those women, so they know that terminating their pregnancy is not their only option,” she said.

Stoker was one of three Queensland senators to speak at the now annual pro-life rally in Brisbane: fellow LNP senator Matt Canavan and One Nation senator Malcolm Roberts also spoke. Retiring Dawson MP George Christensen was invited by Cherish Life Queensland.
 
Police said about 1000 people crowded into Speakers’ Corner outside Parliament House in George Street before marching around the inner city.

Cherish Life Queensland claims to be non-political, but people at the rally were encouraged to place Labor and The Greens last when they vote at the May 21 federal elections.

In an outspoken address, Stoker described as “madness” the skilled training given to doctors – “so they might heal” – for them to subsequently end pregnancies in hospitals.

“It is just wrong that our society seems to be more ready to condemn cruelty against a dog or a cat than it is a human child, even one that is old enough to be capable of life outside the womb.”

National Party senator Canavan, who is a member of Cherish Life Queensland, told reporters last week the federal government’s net zero carbon emission policy was “dead”, only to be severely rebuked by senior Nationals and Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

Canavan said Christians “rose up” at the 2019 federal election against moves by former ALP leader Bill Shorten.

“He would have been prime minister if it wasn’t for a lot of us [Christians],” he said.

“Christians and other faith members got up and voted against the Labor Party in droves. Now the Labor Party is a little bit wary of Christians. They are a little bit scared of us.”

Canavan said he would introduce a private member’s bill to prohibit the Medicare rebate for abortions where a person decides to end a pregnancy after learning the gender of the unborn child is not what they wished.
 
 
77
Views

9 COUNTRIES TO WATCH ON THE 2021 CORRUPTION PERCEPTIONS INDEX, AUSTRALIA INSIDE

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 77 views • 2022-04-30 15:07 • added this tag no more than 24h

That Australia could now be listed as a problem country in the global corruption perceptions index of Transparency International is appalling. Successive Australian federal govts, Labor and Liberal, ran clean governments.That has now changed under Morrison
 
1. AUSTRALIA

Australia (CPI score: 73) is one of the world’s most significant decliners, having dropped 12 points since 2012 to hit a record low this year. Its deteriorating score indicates systemic failings in tackling public sector corruption. Despite public calls and previous promises, last year Australia missed a landmark opportunity to establish a national anti-corruption agency with broad powers to investigate corruption.

And like many other top-scoring countries on the CPI, Australia needs to do much more to end its complicity in transnational corruption, which is not measured by the Index.

The Pandora Papers investigations in 2021 showed that, thanks to persistent opacity in real estate ownership, Australia’s property market is an easy target for corrupt individuals from abroad.

Enforcement remains weak against companies paying bribes to secure contracts abroad. This shortcoming creates major corruption risks in other Pacific countries too. Many businesses working in the Pacific, particularly in the extractives sector, are registered in Australia – a sector which most people surveyed by the 2021 Global Corruption Barometer believe is tainted with corruption.

As Australia heads into a federal election, anti-corruption commitments – and a firm resolution to follow through on them – will matter more than ever. The establishment of a strong anti-corruption commission, which is long overdue, should be a top priority.

 


2. AUSTRIA

With a score of 74, Austria is at risk of losing ground at the top of the Index. After some years of progress, the country’s slow decline – while not yet statistically significant – sends a warning signal to established democracies about the dangers of neglecting anti-corruption efforts.
 
The government has delayed implementing the national anti-corruption strategy under cover of the COVID-19 pandemic, while politicians have attacked the judiciary and investigative authorities.

In 2021, now-former Chancellor Sebastian Kurz became the target of two inquiries. In May, anti-corruption prosecutors started to investigate whether Kurz lied about a 2019 Ibiza corruption case when testifying to a parliamentary commission. In October, a separate corruption investigation was opened to examine allegations that he misused public funds during his time as foreign minister in 2016.

The Council of Europe’s Group of States against Corruption has also noted Austria’s lack of anti-corruption efforts and recently found that government had satisfactorily dealt with only two of its 17 recommendations made in 2017. As investigations continue into Kurz and his allies, the new chancellor must rebuild trust in the government and drive forward the country’s neglected anti-corruption strategy.

3. EL SALVADOR

In 2022, El Salvador (34) could establish itself as a dictatorship if authorities there continue to undermine democracy, harass critics and restrict civil and political rights.

The country has increasingly restricted access to information and shown a severe lack of transparency in the spending of public funds. Senior government officials are alleged to have engaged in multi-million dollar corruption schemes in their management of the COVID-19 crisis and as part of local elections.
 
Last year, several officials from both the current and previous governments were included in the so-called Engel List released by the United States government over accusations of corruption and assaults on democracy in El Salvador.

There is also concern over steps taken by the government to weaken the independence of justice institutions and close down civic space. In 2021, the newly elected Legislative Assembly dismissed and replaced all five judges of the Supreme Court’s Constitutional Chamber and the Attorney General without due process, while publicly attacking and promoting laws that threaten civil society organisations, human rights defenders, and independent media.

4. KAZAKHSTAN

Kazakhstan (37) was rocked by civil unrest at the start of 2022. What started as a protest over a spike in fuel price quickly turned into countrywide demonstrations over corruption and inequality. The wealth that the country’s political elite allegedly amassed through corruption was a particular concern during protests.
 
In 2021, the Pandora Papers investigation included reports that a woman with close ties to former president Nursultan Nazarbayev received a suspicious payment of US$30 million from shell companies that journalists have linked to two Kazakh oligarchs. Prior to that, a 2019 investigation uncovered offshore properties – reportedly worth US$785 million – that allegedly belong to Nazarbayev’s relatives. These disclosures were ignored by authorities, even as they pursued several other high-profile corruption cases. However, convicted senior officials have usually been pardoned or released early.

Reporting directly to the president, the Anti-Corruption Agency of Kazakhstan has focused on sectors like agriculture and healthcare. The largest industries – including oil and gas, finance and construction – remain beyond its attention, as guided by the 2022-2026 draft anti-corruption policy.

The tragic 5 January events that ensued in Almaty underscore the dangers of ignoring corruption in priority areas, but Kazakhstan has an opportunity to turn the tide. So that policies and decisions benefit the common good – not just a privileged few – the way forward should also include meaningful opportunities for civil society participation.

5. LEBANON

In Lebanon (24), high levels of political corruption have caused multiple crises, including the disastrous explosion in the capital’s port in 2020. Even before this tragedy, continuous protests since October 2019 were calling for systemic reforms. In the wake of the Beirut blast, Lebanon sunk into economic collapse and political instability, going without a government for a 13-month period. Widespread protests by Lebanese citizens against political corruption and the economic meltdown were met with persecution and harsh suppression of basic rights by the authorities, even as politicians failed to address the unfolding crises. Unsurprisingly, Lebanon has declined on the CPI, dropping 6 points (from 30) since 2012.
 
Several laws passed in the last two years are nowhere near being enforced. Lebanon also has major deficiencies in public procurement processes and financial transparency. In June 2021, attempting to restore confidence in the government after the Beirut blast, the parliament adopted a new public procurement law. It has disturbing loopholes that allow important information, conflicts of interests and company owners to remain hidden, among other gaps such as not accounting for the role of civil society organisations.

Of all the offshore companies revealed in the Pandora Papers leaks, Lebanese politicians and businesspeople owned the greatest number of them – a whopping 346 companies. Although the leaks named several public and politically exposed figures, no investigation has been undertaken by the Lebanese authorities.


6. MOZAMBIQUE

Although not statistically significant, Mozambique (26) has dropped 5 points (from 31) on the CPI since 2012. The country is still grappling with the fallout of the “hidden debt” corruption scandal, exposed in 2016. In this scheme, senior officials in Mozambique reportedly conspired with bankers in Europe and business people based in the Middle East to arrange a US$2 billion loan to the country. These funds were then allegedly misappropriated, including through bribes and kickbacks.
 
The ensuing financial crisis has meant that the Mozambican state is unable to fulfil its obligations, including protecting the rights of people displaced by the Cabo Delgado conflict. Individuals accused of orchestrating the hidden debt scheme went on trial in late 2021.

The scandal and its aftermath exemplify the dangers of executive overreach and a lack of effective checks and balances – weak parliamentary oversight, in particular. The ongoing high-profile case offers hope, but also serves as an accountability test. What happens next should be closely watched.

7. RUSSIA

In Russia (29), the “foreign agent law” has made reporting on corruption even more dangerous. Authorities raided the homes and offices of journalists and activists investigating government corruption and declared them “foreign agents” subject to burdensome financial reporting and publishing constraints.
 
The Russian authorities sent another clear signal to critics when they jailed opposition leader and anti-corruption activist Alexey Navalny upon his return from Germany, where he was recovering from nerve agent poisoning. At the same time, Navalny’s team released a bombshell investigation into a secret luxury estate on the Black Sea coast, allegedly owned by President Putin’s inner circle.

Authorities used the pandemic as a pretext to ban all mass gatherings and apply restrictions to so-called “single pickets”, or one-person protests. Corruption and abuse also disproportionally affects people already facing discrimination, such as LGBTQIA+ communities.

This dire situation was brought to worldwide attention when the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize was jointly awarded to Dmitry Muratov, editor of the independent paper Novaya Gazeta, and Filipino investigative journalist Maria Ressa, "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace." During Muratov's time at the Novaya Gazeta, six of its journalists have been murdered.

8. SENEGAL

From 2012 to 2016, Senegal’s performance on the CPI significantly improved (from 36 to 43). Advancements during this period include the creation of the Office for the Fight against Fraud and Corruption (OFNAC) and passage of the asset declaration law, among other reforms. But progress halted there, with Senegal’s 2021 score dropping 2 points compared to last year.
 
In 2020, a national anti-corruption strategy was adopted, but its prospects are unclear, as resourcing and implementation remain a challenge. In recent years, the work of anti-corruption institutions – such as OFNAC – has lacked rigour, and numerous denunciations by the public about mismanagement of public funds and natural resources have not been adequately investigated.

Patchy enforcement of anti-corruption legislation is also a major concern. Freedom House recently downgraded Senegal’s rating from “free” to “partly free”, citing politically motivated corruption prosecutions of opposition leaders.

In 2019, previously unknown details surfaced surrounding the 2012 sale of concession rights for two offshore oil blocks, implicating President Macky Sall and his brother Aliou Sall in possible foreign bribery. In response to public pressure, Aliou Sall resigned from public office, but rejected claims that he received secret payments. Eventually, an investigation into his role was dismissed. Last year, Transparency International filed complaints in six countries that have jurisdiction over the case.


9. SLOVENIA

With a score of 57, Slovenia has reached a historical low. Following the establishment of a relatively solid anti-corruption framework, the government has not enforced existing rules to uphold transparency and integrity in public procurement during the pandemic.
 
Simultaneously, there has been pressure on independent oversight bodies, threats to freedom of peaceful assembly and disproportionate limitations on the right to protest – recently intensified through a lawsuit against an organiser of anti-government protests. The Slovenian government has engaged in a smear campaign against the country’s public media outlets and restricted payments to the Slovenian Press Agency, bringing it to the brink of collapse. Most recently, the announcement of fundamental changes in the news and political programming of public broadcaster TV Slovenia has raised concerns among journalists and the public about political influence on management.

As Slovenia enters a super election year, clear anti-corruption commitments are needed from across the political spectrum. To prevent further losses on the CPI and to address public distrust in the government, Slovenia needs to embed citizen participation and consultation into all levels of decision-making, transpose the EU whistleblowing directive in line with civil society recommendations and international best practice, strengthen its independent ethics and oversight bodies and update its Resolution on the Prevention of Corruption. view all
That Australia could now be listed as a problem country in the global corruption perceptions index of Transparency International is appalling. Successive Australian federal govts, Labor and Liberal, ran clean governments.That has now changed under Morrison
 
1. AUSTRALIA

Australia (CPI score: 73) is one of the world’s most significant decliners, having dropped 12 points since 2012 to hit a record low this year. Its deteriorating score indicates systemic failings in tackling public sector corruption. Despite public calls and previous promises, last year Australia missed a landmark opportunity to establish a national anti-corruption agency with broad powers to investigate corruption.

And like many other top-scoring countries on the CPI, Australia needs to do much more to end its complicity in transnational corruption, which is not measured by the Index.

The Pandora Papers investigations in 2021 showed that, thanks to persistent opacity in real estate ownership, Australia’s property market is an easy target for corrupt individuals from abroad.

Enforcement remains weak against companies paying bribes to secure contracts abroad. This shortcoming creates major corruption risks in other Pacific countries too. Many businesses working in the Pacific, particularly in the extractives sector, are registered in Australia – a sector which most people surveyed by the 2021 Global Corruption Barometer believe is tainted with corruption.

As Australia heads into a federal election, anti-corruption commitments – and a firm resolution to follow through on them – will matter more than ever. The establishment of a strong anti-corruption commission, which is long overdue, should be a top priority.

 


2. AUSTRIA

With a score of 74, Austria is at risk of losing ground at the top of the Index. After some years of progress, the country’s slow decline – while not yet statistically significant – sends a warning signal to established democracies about the dangers of neglecting anti-corruption efforts.
 
The government has delayed implementing the national anti-corruption strategy under cover of the COVID-19 pandemic, while politicians have attacked the judiciary and investigative authorities.

In 2021, now-former Chancellor Sebastian Kurz became the target of two inquiries. In May, anti-corruption prosecutors started to investigate whether Kurz lied about a 2019 Ibiza corruption case when testifying to a parliamentary commission. In October, a separate corruption investigation was opened to examine allegations that he misused public funds during his time as foreign minister in 2016.

The Council of Europe’s Group of States against Corruption has also noted Austria’s lack of anti-corruption efforts and recently found that government had satisfactorily dealt with only two of its 17 recommendations made in 2017. As investigations continue into Kurz and his allies, the new chancellor must rebuild trust in the government and drive forward the country’s neglected anti-corruption strategy.

3. EL SALVADOR

In 2022, El Salvador (34) could establish itself as a dictatorship if authorities there continue to undermine democracy, harass critics and restrict civil and political rights.

The country has increasingly restricted access to information and shown a severe lack of transparency in the spending of public funds. Senior government officials are alleged to have engaged in multi-million dollar corruption schemes in their management of the COVID-19 crisis and as part of local elections.
 
Last year, several officials from both the current and previous governments were included in the so-called Engel List released by the United States government over accusations of corruption and assaults on democracy in El Salvador.

There is also concern over steps taken by the government to weaken the independence of justice institutions and close down civic space. In 2021, the newly elected Legislative Assembly dismissed and replaced all five judges of the Supreme Court’s Constitutional Chamber and the Attorney General without due process, while publicly attacking and promoting laws that threaten civil society organisations, human rights defenders, and independent media.

4. KAZAKHSTAN

Kazakhstan (37) was rocked by civil unrest at the start of 2022. What started as a protest over a spike in fuel price quickly turned into countrywide demonstrations over corruption and inequality. The wealth that the country’s political elite allegedly amassed through corruption was a particular concern during protests.
 
In 2021, the Pandora Papers investigation included reports that a woman with close ties to former president Nursultan Nazarbayev received a suspicious payment of US$30 million from shell companies that journalists have linked to two Kazakh oligarchs. Prior to that, a 2019 investigation uncovered offshore properties – reportedly worth US$785 million – that allegedly belong to Nazarbayev’s relatives. These disclosures were ignored by authorities, even as they pursued several other high-profile corruption cases. However, convicted senior officials have usually been pardoned or released early.

Reporting directly to the president, the Anti-Corruption Agency of Kazakhstan has focused on sectors like agriculture and healthcare. The largest industries – including oil and gas, finance and construction – remain beyond its attention, as guided by the 2022-2026 draft anti-corruption policy.

The tragic 5 January events that ensued in Almaty underscore the dangers of ignoring corruption in priority areas, but Kazakhstan has an opportunity to turn the tide. So that policies and decisions benefit the common good – not just a privileged few – the way forward should also include meaningful opportunities for civil society participation.

5. LEBANON

In Lebanon (24), high levels of political corruption have caused multiple crises, including the disastrous explosion in the capital’s port in 2020. Even before this tragedy, continuous protests since October 2019 were calling for systemic reforms. In the wake of the Beirut blast, Lebanon sunk into economic collapse and political instability, going without a government for a 13-month period. Widespread protests by Lebanese citizens against political corruption and the economic meltdown were met with persecution and harsh suppression of basic rights by the authorities, even as politicians failed to address the unfolding crises. Unsurprisingly, Lebanon has declined on the CPI, dropping 6 points (from 30) since 2012.
 
Several laws passed in the last two years are nowhere near being enforced. Lebanon also has major deficiencies in public procurement processes and financial transparency. In June 2021, attempting to restore confidence in the government after the Beirut blast, the parliament adopted a new public procurement law. It has disturbing loopholes that allow important information, conflicts of interests and company owners to remain hidden, among other gaps such as not accounting for the role of civil society organisations.

Of all the offshore companies revealed in the Pandora Papers leaks, Lebanese politicians and businesspeople owned the greatest number of them – a whopping 346 companies. Although the leaks named several public and politically exposed figures, no investigation has been undertaken by the Lebanese authorities.


6. MOZAMBIQUE

Although not statistically significant, Mozambique (26) has dropped 5 points (from 31) on the CPI since 2012. The country is still grappling with the fallout of the “hidden debt” corruption scandal, exposed in 2016. In this scheme, senior officials in Mozambique reportedly conspired with bankers in Europe and business people based in the Middle East to arrange a US$2 billion loan to the country. These funds were then allegedly misappropriated, including through bribes and kickbacks.
 
The ensuing financial crisis has meant that the Mozambican state is unable to fulfil its obligations, including protecting the rights of people displaced by the Cabo Delgado conflict. Individuals accused of orchestrating the hidden debt scheme went on trial in late 2021.

The scandal and its aftermath exemplify the dangers of executive overreach and a lack of effective checks and balances – weak parliamentary oversight, in particular. The ongoing high-profile case offers hope, but also serves as an accountability test. What happens next should be closely watched.

7. RUSSIA

In Russia (29), the “foreign agent law” has made reporting on corruption even more dangerous. Authorities raided the homes and offices of journalists and activists investigating government corruption and declared them “foreign agents” subject to burdensome financial reporting and publishing constraints.
 
The Russian authorities sent another clear signal to critics when they jailed opposition leader and anti-corruption activist Alexey Navalny upon his return from Germany, where he was recovering from nerve agent poisoning. At the same time, Navalny’s team released a bombshell investigation into a secret luxury estate on the Black Sea coast, allegedly owned by President Putin’s inner circle.

Authorities used the pandemic as a pretext to ban all mass gatherings and apply restrictions to so-called “single pickets”, or one-person protests. Corruption and abuse also disproportionally affects people already facing discrimination, such as LGBTQIA+ communities.

This dire situation was brought to worldwide attention when the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize was jointly awarded to Dmitry Muratov, editor of the independent paper Novaya Gazeta, and Filipino investigative journalist Maria Ressa, "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace." During Muratov's time at the Novaya Gazeta, six of its journalists have been murdered.

8. SENEGAL

From 2012 to 2016, Senegal’s performance on the CPI significantly improved (from 36 to 43). Advancements during this period include the creation of the Office for the Fight against Fraud and Corruption (OFNAC) and passage of the asset declaration law, among other reforms. But progress halted there, with Senegal’s 2021 score dropping 2 points compared to last year.
 
In 2020, a national anti-corruption strategy was adopted, but its prospects are unclear, as resourcing and implementation remain a challenge. In recent years, the work of anti-corruption institutions – such as OFNAC – has lacked rigour, and numerous denunciations by the public about mismanagement of public funds and natural resources have not been adequately investigated.

Patchy enforcement of anti-corruption legislation is also a major concern. Freedom House recently downgraded Senegal’s rating from “free” to “partly free”, citing politically motivated corruption prosecutions of opposition leaders.

In 2019, previously unknown details surfaced surrounding the 2012 sale of concession rights for two offshore oil blocks, implicating President Macky Sall and his brother Aliou Sall in possible foreign bribery. In response to public pressure, Aliou Sall resigned from public office, but rejected claims that he received secret payments. Eventually, an investigation into his role was dismissed. Last year, Transparency International filed complaints in six countries that have jurisdiction over the case.


9. SLOVENIA

With a score of 57, Slovenia has reached a historical low. Following the establishment of a relatively solid anti-corruption framework, the government has not enforced existing rules to uphold transparency and integrity in public procurement during the pandemic.
 
Simultaneously, there has been pressure on independent oversight bodies, threats to freedom of peaceful assembly and disproportionate limitations on the right to protest – recently intensified through a lawsuit against an organiser of anti-government protests. The Slovenian government has engaged in a smear campaign against the country’s public media outlets and restricted payments to the Slovenian Press Agency, bringing it to the brink of collapse. Most recently, the announcement of fundamental changes in the news and political programming of public broadcaster TV Slovenia has raised concerns among journalists and the public about political influence on management.

As Slovenia enters a super election year, clear anti-corruption commitments are needed from across the political spectrum. To prevent further losses on the CPI and to address public distrust in the government, Slovenia needs to embed citizen participation and consultation into all levels of decision-making, transpose the EU whistleblowing directive in line with civil society recommendations and international best practice, strengthen its independent ethics and oversight bodies and update its Resolution on the Prevention of Corruption.
69
Views

Only one of these will screw the Australia. Can you pick the one?

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 69 views • 2022-04-30 14:51 • added this tag no more than 24h

Australia.....know your screws! Only one of these will screw the whole country. Can you pick the one?
  view all
Australia.....know your screws! Only one of these will screw the whole country. Can you pick the one?
 
78
Views

VICTORIAN TEACHERS RALLY AGAINST MANDATES MELBOURNE

aussie24 wrote the post • 0 comments • 78 views • 2022-04-30 14:42 • added this tag no more than 24h

VICTORIAN TEACHERS RALLY AGAINST MANDATES 
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA 
PARLIAMENT [email protected] 
30/04/2022 
END ALL MANDATES 
  view all
VICTORIAN TEACHERS RALLY AGAINST MANDATES 
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA 
PARLIAMENT [email protected] 
30/04/2022 
END ALL MANDATES 
 
90
Views

The closure of the Marsden Point oil refinery signals the end of New Zealand’s only oil refinery after sixty years.

nz news wrote the post • 0 comments • 90 views • 2022-04-19 10:26 • added this tag no more than 24h

New Zealand needs to be energy independent. The closure of the Marsden Point oil refinery signals the end of New Zealand’s only oil refinery after sixty years. The refinery is capable of processing enough oil to meet a majority of domestic demand (MBIE). Instead, we will imp...
 

 

 
Import huge amounts of oil. NZ needs fuel security and energy independence in the time of uncertainty and price increases rather than relying on imports in the name of being 'green'
  view all
New Zealand needs to be energy independent. The closure of the Marsden Point oil refinery signals the end of New Zealand’s only oil refinery after sixty years. The refinery is capable of processing enough oil to meet a majority of domestic demand (MBIE). Instead, we will imp...
 

 

 
Import huge amounts of oil. NZ needs fuel security and energy independence in the time of uncertainty and price increases rather than relying on imports in the name of being 'green'
 
116
Views

House shifting services in Chandigarh

jdmoverspackers wrote the post • 0 comments • 116 views • 2022-04-15 02:32 • added this tag no more than 24h

Choosing the right house shifting services in Chandigarh can be a very tiring task. Therefore, we have made it short for you. JD Movers and Packers offer the best shifting services in Tricity area and for the outskirts also. we offer a vast range of services to make your shifting much easier and smoother. are the best in town when it comes to relocation. Get in touch with us to know more about our services and plans. We take complete care of your goods and return them to you as they were the last time you saw them. 
Visit: https://jdmoversandpackers.com/
Phone Number: (981) 3796-966 view all
Choosing the right house shifting services in Chandigarh can be a very tiring task. Therefore, we have made it short for you. JD Movers and Packers offer the best shifting services in Tricity area and for the outskirts also. we offer a vast range of services to make your shifting much easier and smoother. are the best in town when it comes to relocation. Get in touch with us to know more about our services and plans. We take complete care of your goods and return them to you as they were the last time you saw them. 
Visit: https://jdmoversandpackers.com/
Phone Number: (981) 3796-966
176
Views

New Zealand High Court ENDS Jacinda Ardern’s Vaccine Mandate: “It’s a Gross Violation of Human Rights”

nz news wrote the post • 0 comments • 176 views • 2022-04-12 18:20 • added this tag no more than 24h

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern was left reeling on Friday after a High Court ruled that her vaccine mandate represented a “gross violation of human rights” for New Zealanders.
 
Justice Francis Cooke ruled that ordering frontline police officers and Defence staff to be vaccinated or face losing their job was not a “reasonably justified” breach of the Bill of Rights.

Nzherald.co.nz reports: The lawyer for the police and Defence staff at the centre of the claim is now calling for the suspended workers to return to their jobs immediately, saying many have given decades of service to their community and are still committed to their jobs.

The challenge, put forward by a group of Defence force and police employees, questioned the legality of making an order under the Covid-19 Public Health Response Act to require vaccination for frontline employees.

The challenge was supported by a group of 37 employees affected by the mandate, who submitted written affidavits to the court.

Minister of Workplace Relations and Safety Michael Wood, Deputy Police Commissioner Tania Kura and NZDF Chief People Officer Brigadier Matthew Weston filed affidavits defending the mandate.

As it stands, 164 of the overall police workforce of nearly 15,700 were affected by the mandate after choosing not to be vaccinated. For NZDF, the mandate affected 115 of its 15,500 staff.

The group relied on two aspects of the Bill of Rights – the right to decline a medical procedure and the right to religious freedom.

On the religious freedom argument, a number of those who made submissions referred to their fundamental objection to taking the Pfizer vaccine, given that it was tested on the cells that were derived from a human foetus.

Justice Cooke agreed with the claim, saying that “an obligation to receive the vaccine which a person objects to because it has been tested on cells derived from a human foetus, potentially an aborted foetus, does involve a limitation on the manifestation of a religious belief.”

However, Justice Cooke disagreed with the claimants’ broader claims that requiring vaccination is inconsistent with holding religious beliefs more generally.

“I do not accept that a belief in an individual’s bodily integrity and personal autonomy is a religious belief or practice. Rather it seems to me, in the circumstances of this case, to be a belief in the secular concept referred to in section 11 of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act.”

Justice Cooke also agreed with the claim that the mandate impinged on the right to decline a medical procedure.

The judge said that while it’s clear the government isn’t forcing Police and NZDF employees to get vaccinated against their will and they still have the right to refuse vaccination, the mandate presents an element of pressure.

“The associated pressure to surrender employment involves a limit on the right to retain that employment, which the above principles suggest can be thought of as an important right or interest recognised not only in domestic law, but in the international instruments,” Justice Cooke stated.

But in considering the two claims, Justice Cooke also considered whether or not the mandate fell within the definitions laid out in the Covid-19 Public Health Response Act.

The court accepted that vaccination has a significant beneficial effect in limiting serious illness, hospitalisation, and death, including with the Omicron variant. However, it was less effective in reducing infection and transmission of Omicron than had been the case with other variants of Covid-19.

“In essence, the order mandating vaccinations for police and NZDF staff was imposed to ensure the continuity of the public services, and to promote public confidence in those services, rather than to stop the spread of Covid-19. Indeed health advice provided to the government was that further mandates were not required to restrict the spread of Covid-19. I am not satisfied that continuity of these services is materially advanced by the order,” the Judge said.

“Covid-19 clearly involves a threat to the continuity of police and NZDF services. That is because the Omicron variant in particular is so transmissible. But that threat exists for both vaccinated and unvaccinated staff. I am not satisfied that the order makes a material difference, including because of the expert evidence before the court on the effects of vaccination on Covid-19 including the Delta and Omicron variants.”

An additional claim that the mandate would disproportionately affect Māori was dismissed by Justice Cooke.
 
  view all
New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern was left reeling on Friday after a High Court ruled that her vaccine mandate represented a “gross violation of human rights” for New Zealanders.
 
Justice Francis Cooke ruled that ordering frontline police officers and Defence staff to be vaccinated or face losing their job was not a “reasonably justified” breach of the Bill of Rights.

Nzherald.co.nz reports: The lawyer for the police and Defence staff at the centre of the claim is now calling for the suspended workers to return to their jobs immediately, saying many have given decades of service to their community and are still committed to their jobs.

The challenge, put forward by a group of Defence force and police employees, questioned the legality of making an order under the Covid-19 Public Health Response Act to require vaccination for frontline employees.

The challenge was supported by a group of 37 employees affected by the mandate, who submitted written affidavits to the court.

Minister of Workplace Relations and Safety Michael Wood, Deputy Police Commissioner Tania Kura and NZDF Chief People Officer Brigadier Matthew Weston filed affidavits defending the mandate.

As it stands, 164 of the overall police workforce of nearly 15,700 were affected by the mandate after choosing not to be vaccinated. For NZDF, the mandate affected 115 of its 15,500 staff.

The group relied on two aspects of the Bill of Rights – the right to decline a medical procedure and the right to religious freedom.

On the religious freedom argument, a number of those who made submissions referred to their fundamental objection to taking the Pfizer vaccine, given that it was tested on the cells that were derived from a human foetus.

Justice Cooke agreed with the claim, saying that “an obligation to receive the vaccine which a person objects to because it has been tested on cells derived from a human foetus, potentially an aborted foetus, does involve a limitation on the manifestation of a religious belief.”

However, Justice Cooke disagreed with the claimants’ broader claims that requiring vaccination is inconsistent with holding religious beliefs more generally.

“I do not accept that a belief in an individual’s bodily integrity and personal autonomy is a religious belief or practice. Rather it seems to me, in the circumstances of this case, to be a belief in the secular concept referred to in section 11 of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act.”

Justice Cooke also agreed with the claim that the mandate impinged on the right to decline a medical procedure.

The judge said that while it’s clear the government isn’t forcing Police and NZDF employees to get vaccinated against their will and they still have the right to refuse vaccination, the mandate presents an element of pressure.

“The associated pressure to surrender employment involves a limit on the right to retain that employment, which the above principles suggest can be thought of as an important right or interest recognised not only in domestic law, but in the international instruments,” Justice Cooke stated.

But in considering the two claims, Justice Cooke also considered whether or not the mandate fell within the definitions laid out in the Covid-19 Public Health Response Act.

The court accepted that vaccination has a significant beneficial effect in limiting serious illness, hospitalisation, and death, including with the Omicron variant. However, it was less effective in reducing infection and transmission of Omicron than had been the case with other variants of Covid-19.

“In essence, the order mandating vaccinations for police and NZDF staff was imposed to ensure the continuity of the public services, and to promote public confidence in those services, rather than to stop the spread of Covid-19. Indeed health advice provided to the government was that further mandates were not required to restrict the spread of Covid-19. I am not satisfied that continuity of these services is materially advanced by the order,” the Judge said.

“Covid-19 clearly involves a threat to the continuity of police and NZDF services. That is because the Omicron variant in particular is so transmissible. But that threat exists for both vaccinated and unvaccinated staff. I am not satisfied that the order makes a material difference, including because of the expert evidence before the court on the effects of vaccination on Covid-19 including the Delta and Omicron variants.”

An additional claim that the mandate would disproportionately affect Māori was dismissed by Justice Cooke.
 
 
128
Views

New Zealand will send more than 50 soldiers to Europe to help distribute aid to Ukraine.

nz news wrote the post • 0 comments • 128 views • 2022-04-12 18:18 • added this tag no more than 24h

New Zealand will send more than 50 soldiers to Europe to help distribute aid to Ukraine. A majority of them will help transport an enormous amount of military equipment being donated for the war effort. view all
New Zealand will send more than 50 soldiers to Europe to help distribute aid to Ukraine. A majority of them will help transport an enormous amount of military equipment being donated for the war effort.
79
Views

A man died after being stuck inside a ramped ambulance for five hours at Flinders, the union says, the sixth death this month linked to the growing crisis.

adelaidenow wrote the post • 0 comments • 79 views • 2022-03-23 09:26 • added this tag no more than 24h

Another death is being blamed on ramping – the sixth this month – as the ambulance union continues to highlight problems in the system regardless of the change of government.

The Ambulance Employees Association says a man aged in his 60s died after being ramped at Flinders Medical Centre for five hours on Tuesday afternoon.

The union says the man went into cardiac arrest and died despite efforts by paramedics and hospital emergency staff to resuscitate him.

“Tragically we have seen another death in our ramping crisis,” the union announced on social media.

It says the man was a Covid patient but it is understood he had been cleared after an earlier diagnosis.

The death came on the same day new Premier Peter Malinauskas confirmed Labor health spokesman Chris Picton – who had relentlessly highlighted ramping as an issue – would be the new health and wellbeing minister.
 
It followed another high-pressure night on the health system with major metropolitan hospital emergency departments operating above capacity at various times.

At 9am on Wednesday there were 102 patients who had been treated in metropolitan EDs but were waiting for a bed or suitable accommodation, including 14 who had been waiting for more than 24 hours.

While demand had eased by morning, the logjam had caused long waits to be treated overnight and at 9am there was still a 291-minute average wait to be seen at the Lyell McEwin Hospital.

The death is the sixth to be linked to ramping this month by the union, although full investigations are still continuing.

On March 15 the union said there had been two deaths overnight linked to delays in ambulances arriving – the next day it linked another death to delays.
 
 
 
  view all
Another death is being blamed on ramping – the sixth this month – as the ambulance union continues to highlight problems in the system regardless of the change of government.

The Ambulance Employees Association says a man aged in his 60s died after being ramped at Flinders Medical Centre for five hours on Tuesday afternoon.

The union says the man went into cardiac arrest and died despite efforts by paramedics and hospital emergency staff to resuscitate him.

“Tragically we have seen another death in our ramping crisis,” the union announced on social media.

It says the man was a Covid patient but it is understood he had been cleared after an earlier diagnosis.

The death came on the same day new Premier Peter Malinauskas confirmed Labor health spokesman Chris Picton – who had relentlessly highlighted ramping as an issue – would be the new health and wellbeing minister.
 
It followed another high-pressure night on the health system with major metropolitan hospital emergency departments operating above capacity at various times.

At 9am on Wednesday there were 102 patients who had been treated in metropolitan EDs but were waiting for a bed or suitable accommodation, including 14 who had been waiting for more than 24 hours.

While demand had eased by morning, the logjam had caused long waits to be treated overnight and at 9am there was still a 291-minute average wait to be seen at the Lyell McEwin Hospital.

The death is the sixth to be linked to ramping this month by the union, although full investigations are still continuing.

On March 15 the union said there had been two deaths overnight linked to delays in ambulances arriving – the next day it linked another death to delays.
 
 
 
 
160
Views

Prosecutors have dropped an application to have a northern suburbs shopping centre frozen with a lawyer for the business blasting the “paucity of evidence” against his client.

adelaidenow wrote the post • 0 comments • 160 views • 2022-03-23 09:23 • added this tag no more than 24h

Prosecutors have dropped their application to have a northern suburbs shopping centre frozen after one of its directors was charged with trafficking in large amounts of cannabis.

Dante Martire, 46, of Payneham South is charged along with three other people with crimes alleged to have occurred in Mount Barker.

On Wednesday, the Director of Public Prosecutions sought to have Mr Martire’s shares in Martins Plaza Shopping Centre frozen while court proceedings continue.

The move was a reversal of a previous application heard earlier this month to have the actual Parafield Gardens shopping centre restrained by the courts.

The order would not have meant the shopping centre would have been shuttered – but that its owners would not have been able to sell it, borrow against it or diminish its value while court proceedings continued.

Judge Karen Thomas ordered that the company be removed as a respondent from the DPP’s application and instead placed as an interested party who would be allowed a voice in the continuing lawsuit.

The move represented a backing down from the DPP’s prior position that they could prove that Mr Martire had a controlling interest in the company.

Instead it was his seven shares in the company out of a total of 35 which were frozen.
 
Steven Hagivassillis, for St Martin Plaza Shopping Centre, said the DPP had pursued the application without officially notifying his client.

“It was disappointing that my client was initially named as a respondent, especially given the paucity of evidence regarding effective control,” Mr Hagivassillis said.

“It appears that the application was pushed at the last proceeding without my clients being served.”

Judge Thomas said it was for the company to take up with the DPP and ordered the shares be seized.

Prosecutors are also trying to have Mr Martire’s interest in another company – Savmar – which they claim he has a controlling interest in.

During the hearing earlier this month Judge Thomas froze a million-dollar Payneham South house and a Beulah Park property that last sold for $650,000, and which belongs to Mr Martire.

She also ordered a silver Ford ute, a blue 1968 Holden sedan be restrained and $410,955 in Mr Martire’s account be frozen.

Documents released by the Adelaide Magistrates Court show police allege Mr Martire, along with Anthony Canova, 46, Rebecca Canova, 43 and Ivan Marotti, 65, cultivated and trafficked cannabis on January 5, 2022.
 
Ms Canova is also charged with trafficking cannabis in McLaren Vale on January 6.

Under the current legislation a large commercial quantity of cannabis is more than 2.5kg or 100 plants. view all
Prosecutors have dropped their application to have a northern suburbs shopping centre frozen after one of its directors was charged with trafficking in large amounts of cannabis.

Dante Martire, 46, of Payneham South is charged along with three other people with crimes alleged to have occurred in Mount Barker.

On Wednesday, the Director of Public Prosecutions sought to have Mr Martire’s shares in Martins Plaza Shopping Centre frozen while court proceedings continue.

The move was a reversal of a previous application heard earlier this month to have the actual Parafield Gardens shopping centre restrained by the courts.

The order would not have meant the shopping centre would have been shuttered – but that its owners would not have been able to sell it, borrow against it or diminish its value while court proceedings continued.

Judge Karen Thomas ordered that the company be removed as a respondent from the DPP’s application and instead placed as an interested party who would be allowed a voice in the continuing lawsuit.

The move represented a backing down from the DPP’s prior position that they could prove that Mr Martire had a controlling interest in the company.

Instead it was his seven shares in the company out of a total of 35 which were frozen.
 
Steven Hagivassillis, for St Martin Plaza Shopping Centre, said the DPP had pursued the application without officially notifying his client.

“It was disappointing that my client was initially named as a respondent, especially given the paucity of evidence regarding effective control,” Mr Hagivassillis said.

“It appears that the application was pushed at the last proceeding without my clients being served.”

Judge Thomas said it was for the company to take up with the DPP and ordered the shares be seized.

Prosecutors are also trying to have Mr Martire’s interest in another company – Savmar – which they claim he has a controlling interest in.

During the hearing earlier this month Judge Thomas froze a million-dollar Payneham South house and a Beulah Park property that last sold for $650,000, and which belongs to Mr Martire.

She also ordered a silver Ford ute, a blue 1968 Holden sedan be restrained and $410,955 in Mr Martire’s account be frozen.

Documents released by the Adelaide Magistrates Court show police allege Mr Martire, along with Anthony Canova, 46, Rebecca Canova, 43 and Ivan Marotti, 65, cultivated and trafficked cannabis on January 5, 2022.
 
Ms Canova is also charged with trafficking cannabis in McLaren Vale on January 6.

Under the current legislation a large commercial quantity of cannabis is more than 2.5kg or 100 plants.
78
Views

Accused NCA bomber guilty of spitting on police officer in jail

adelaidenow wrote the post • 0 comments • 78 views • 2022-03-23 09:15 • added this tag no more than 24h

The man accused of bombing the National Crime Authority in Adelaide has been found guilty of assaulting police.
Officers had been called to the Adelaide Remand Centre in 2018 following reports Domenic Perre, the key suspect in the 1994 blast, had been assaulted.
As the investigator approached Perre inside his cell in 2018, he turned and spat on him. Perre did not testify at his trial but did deny it happened.

 
His lawyers argued there was no forensic evidence and the officer's recollection was coloured by 63-year-old Perre's notoriety.
However, the magistrate ruled today the responding officer was acting properly within his duties and found Perre guilty.

He was not in court for the verdict because he is unwell and may have contracted COVID-19, his lawyer said.

Perre will be sentenced for the police assault at the end of March.

He is also on trial over the 1994 NCA bombing, accused of murdering a federal police officer.

That case is with a Supreme Court justice and a date for the verdict has not been set yet.
  view all


The man accused of bombing the National Crime Authority in Adelaide has been found guilty of assaulting police.
Officers had been called to the Adelaide Remand Centre in 2018 following reports Domenic Perre, the key suspect in the 1994 blast, had been assaulted.
As the investigator approached Perre inside his cell in 2018, he turned and spat on him. Perre did not testify at his trial but did deny it happened.

 
His lawyers argued there was no forensic evidence and the officer's recollection was coloured by 63-year-old Perre's notoriety.
However, the magistrate ruled today the responding officer was acting properly within his duties and found Perre guilty.

He was not in court for the verdict because he is unwell and may have contracted COVID-19, his lawyer said.

Perre will be sentenced for the police assault at the end of March.

He is also on trial over the 1994 NCA bombing, accused of murdering a federal police officer.

That case is with a Supreme Court justice and a date for the verdict has not been set yet.
 
84
Views

Labor's huge win against the Liberals in the South Australian state election underscores an important lesson in the upcoming federal election.

adelaidenow wrote the post • 0 comments • 84 views • 2022-03-23 08:50 • added this tag no more than 24h

Federal Labor and Liberal figures say there are lessons to be learned out of the South Australian state election contest.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison is poised to pull the trigger on a federal election in coming weeks, with May 14 widely expected to be poll day.

In South Australia on Saturday night, Liberal leader Steven Marshall conceded the loss of government to the Labor opposition led by Peter Malinauskas after only one term.
 
The loss was the first for any incumbent state or territory government during the pandemic.

Retiring federal Liberal MP Nicolle Flint said the party would need to pay attention to the requirements of Mr Morrison’s “quiet Australians”, who were devastated by issues such as the SA Liberal government’s decision to axe the Adelaide 500 Supercars race.
 
She said suburban voters, who were already impacted by the loss of car manufacturing jobs and the COVID-19 pandemic, felt the motor race decision was like “another nail in the coffin”.

Labor MP Amanda Rishworth said while the Morrison government had talked about jobs, voters in suburban SA had not benefited.

“The messaging around the economy and jobs has not been as tangible as it should have been out in the suburbs,” she told Sky News.

“We have to speak to bread and butter issues - that is the lesson.”
 
Cabinet minister Anne Ruston said the state election had been fought on issues around health and the Marshall government’s management of the pandemic, not federal issues.

Senator Ruston said when it came to the federal election, it would be fought on jobs and national security.

“They are two different elections and they are going to be fought on two different grounds,” she said.

She rejected suggestions Mr Marshall should have picked more of a fight with Canberra in order to be seen as a strong leader for his state.

“I reckon Australians want our governments to work together,” she said.

One of the key factors in the state election which could impact on the federal result is the shifting of votes from minor parties such as SA Best - led by former senator Nick Xenophon - to Labor, and the strength of the Greens vote.

It could see the defeat of two sitting crossbench senators, Rex Patrick and Stirling Griff.

With the seat of Boothby set to be a key battleground in the federal vote, a swing in the state seat covering that area to Labor will give the federal opposition some heart.
 
Prime Minister responds

On Sunday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison congratulated Mr Malinauskas on the win and wished Mr Marshall well.

“It’s a significant victory and they are elected with a very strong mandate to move forward with many issues that they’ve intended take forward,” Mr Morrison told reports in Sydney.

“To my dear friend, Steven Marshall, who has been an outstanding Premier, I want to wish him all the very best and I want to thank him for the tremendous role that he played in turning around his own state.

“I want to thank him for his great leadership, I also want to thank him for the very positive and constructive role he played around the national cabinet table.

“Steven Marshall ran a good show for the time he served as premier and I was very pleased to work closely with him on turning the state around, getting people into jobs, getting investment into businesses, and putting confidence back.”
  view all
Federal Labor and Liberal figures say there are lessons to be learned out of the South Australian state election contest.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison is poised to pull the trigger on a federal election in coming weeks, with May 14 widely expected to be poll day.

In South Australia on Saturday night, Liberal leader Steven Marshall conceded the loss of government to the Labor opposition led by Peter Malinauskas after only one term.
 
The loss was the first for any incumbent state or territory government during the pandemic.

Retiring federal Liberal MP Nicolle Flint said the party would need to pay attention to the requirements of Mr Morrison’s “quiet Australians”, who were devastated by issues such as the SA Liberal government’s decision to axe the Adelaide 500 Supercars race.
 
She said suburban voters, who were already impacted by the loss of car manufacturing jobs and the COVID-19 pandemic, felt the motor race decision was like “another nail in the coffin”.

Labor MP Amanda Rishworth said while the Morrison government had talked about jobs, voters in suburban SA had not benefited.

“The messaging around the economy and jobs has not been as tangible as it should have been out in the suburbs,” she told Sky News.

“We have to speak to bread and butter issues - that is the lesson.”
 
Cabinet minister Anne Ruston said the state election had been fought on issues around health and the Marshall government’s management of the pandemic, not federal issues.

Senator Ruston said when it came to the federal election, it would be fought on jobs and national security.

“They are two different elections and they are going to be fought on two different grounds,” she said.

She rejected suggestions Mr Marshall should have picked more of a fight with Canberra in order to be seen as a strong leader for his state.

“I reckon Australians want our governments to work together,” she said.

One of the key factors in the state election which could impact on the federal result is the shifting of votes from minor parties such as SA Best - led by former senator Nick Xenophon - to Labor, and the strength of the Greens vote.

It could see the defeat of two sitting crossbench senators, Rex Patrick and Stirling Griff.

With the seat of Boothby set to be a key battleground in the federal vote, a swing in the state seat covering that area to Labor will give the federal opposition some heart.
 
Prime Minister responds

On Sunday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison congratulated Mr Malinauskas on the win and wished Mr Marshall well.

“It’s a significant victory and they are elected with a very strong mandate to move forward with many issues that they’ve intended take forward,” Mr Morrison told reports in Sydney.

“To my dear friend, Steven Marshall, who has been an outstanding Premier, I want to wish him all the very best and I want to thank him for the tremendous role that he played in turning around his own state.

“I want to thank him for his great leadership, I also want to thank him for the very positive and constructive role he played around the national cabinet table.

“Steven Marshall ran a good show for the time he served as premier and I was very pleased to work closely with him on turning the state around, getting people into jobs, getting investment into businesses, and putting confidence back.”
 
71
Views

Peter Malinauskas says the state’s hospitals had one of their worst periods in terms of demand last week and SA health is now racing to prepare for a COVID surge.

adelaidenow wrote the post • 0 comments • 71 views • 2022-03-23 08:48 • added this tag no more than 24h

South Australia will boost hospital capacity to handle COVID-19 patients amid forecasts for case numbers to increase sharply.

New Premier Peter Malinauskas said SA Health had been asked to look at ways to ensure hospitals were better prepared in light of recently updated modelling, which pointed to 8000 cases a day within the next few weeks.

“What you will see in that modelling is that case numbers, even with current policy settings, are set to escalate in a rather significant way,” Mr Malinauskas said.
 
“South Australians are entitled to know where we’re at.

“People have seen case numbers go up and that looks as though it’s continuing in the very near future.”

Mr Malinauskas said a briefing with health officials had revealed SA hospitals were under extraordinary strain and had one of their worst periods last week in terms of demand.
 
That resulted in a decision on Friday to cancel some elective surgery, he said.

The new premier has also signalled a shift in the way the SA government manages the pandemic, with a decision to abolish the COVID Ready Committee and put responsibility in the hands of a sub-committee of the state cabinet.

He said the Emergency Management Council would have more authority to make decisions.

Mr Malinauskas said more broadly he had a desire for SA to fall into line with other states in terms of ongoing virus rules.

Amid concerns around the latest virus modelling, SA will keep its mask mandates and isolation rules in place but the premier said more would be said on those rules on Friday after the first meeting of the Emergency Management Council.

SA reported another 3686 new virus infections on Tuesday with 165 people in hospital including 11 in intensive care.
  view all
South Australia will boost hospital capacity to handle COVID-19 patients amid forecasts for case numbers to increase sharply.

New Premier Peter Malinauskas said SA Health had been asked to look at ways to ensure hospitals were better prepared in light of recently updated modelling, which pointed to 8000 cases a day within the next few weeks.

“What you will see in that modelling is that case numbers, even with current policy settings, are set to escalate in a rather significant way,” Mr Malinauskas said.
 
“South Australians are entitled to know where we’re at.

“People have seen case numbers go up and that looks as though it’s continuing in the very near future.”

Mr Malinauskas said a briefing with health officials had revealed SA hospitals were under extraordinary strain and had one of their worst periods last week in terms of demand.
 
That resulted in a decision on Friday to cancel some elective surgery, he said.

The new premier has also signalled a shift in the way the SA government manages the pandemic, with a decision to abolish the COVID Ready Committee and put responsibility in the hands of a sub-committee of the state cabinet.

He said the Emergency Management Council would have more authority to make decisions.

Mr Malinauskas said more broadly he had a desire for SA to fall into line with other states in terms of ongoing virus rules.

Amid concerns around the latest virus modelling, SA will keep its mask mandates and isolation rules in place but the premier said more would be said on those rules on Friday after the first meeting of the Emergency Management Council.

SA reported another 3686 new virus infections on Tuesday with 165 people in hospital including 11 in intensive care.
 
77
Views

The federal government has imposed an immediate ban on Australian exports of alumina and aluminium shipments to Russia alongside a new suite of support measures for Ukraine.

PerthNow wrote the post • 0 comments • 77 views • 2022-03-20 17:05 • added this tag no more than 24h

The federal government has imposed an immediate ban on Australian exports of alumina and aluminium shipments to Russia alongside a new suite of support measures for Ukraine.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said this will reduce Russia's ability to produce weaponry, including guns, ammunition, and missiles.

"Our decision here should say very clearly to all companies operating in Australia, we are watching these things very, very carefully," he told reporters in Sydney on Sunday.

"It is vital that we ensure that we diversify away from providing any support to Russia, particularly at a time they are invading their neighbours."

Australia will donate military equipment and coal to the Ukrainian effort to defend their country from invasion while placing additional sanctions on Russia.

Following discussions between Mr Morrison, Defence Minister Peter Dutton and their Ukrainian counterparts, an additional $21 million worth of Australian Defence Force stock will seek to meet priority requests from Ukraine, the government announced on Sunday morning.

It comes on top of $70 million in military assistance Australia has already provided.

Australians who want to support those fleeing Ukraine will be able to make tax deductible donations to approved organisations supporting refugees in Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Hungary.

Ukrainians fleeing the conflict who have arrived in Australia will also be able to apply for a three-year temporary humanitarian visa.

Australia will donate at least 70,000 tonnes of thermal coal for Ukraine's power stations and withhold bauxite, used to make aluminium, from Russia.

An additional $30 million in humanitarian assistance will focus on protecting displaced women and children and addressing food shortages.

Australian Council for International Development CEO Marc Purcell said NGOs would work with government on delivering the assistance through the Australian Humanitarian Partnership.

"This is a critical intervention for the Ukrainian people in their hour of need and a demonstration of solidarity with their plight," he said.

The aid announcement comes after China's Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng warned against the unimaginable consequences of forcing a major nuclear power "into a corner".

Mr Le told a Beijing security forum on Saturday the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation should also avoid expanding further towards Russia.

He said the sanctions against the country are "getting more and more outrageous" and will only harm ordinary citizens and the global economy.

"History has proven time and again that sanctions cannot solve problems," Mr Le said.

Australia is not a member of NATO but allies including the United States and United Kingdom are. view all
The federal government has imposed an immediate ban on Australian exports of alumina and aluminium shipments to Russia alongside a new suite of support measures for Ukraine.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said this will reduce Russia's ability to produce weaponry, including guns, ammunition, and missiles.

"Our decision here should say very clearly to all companies operating in Australia, we are watching these things very, very carefully," he told reporters in Sydney on Sunday.

"It is vital that we ensure that we diversify away from providing any support to Russia, particularly at a time they are invading their neighbours."

Australia will donate military equipment and coal to the Ukrainian effort to defend their country from invasion while placing additional sanctions on Russia.

Following discussions between Mr Morrison, Defence Minister Peter Dutton and their Ukrainian counterparts, an additional $21 million worth of Australian Defence Force stock will seek to meet priority requests from Ukraine, the government announced on Sunday morning.

It comes on top of $70 million in military assistance Australia has already provided.

Australians who want to support those fleeing Ukraine will be able to make tax deductible donations to approved organisations supporting refugees in Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Hungary.

Ukrainians fleeing the conflict who have arrived in Australia will also be able to apply for a three-year temporary humanitarian visa.

Australia will donate at least 70,000 tonnes of thermal coal for Ukraine's power stations and withhold bauxite, used to make aluminium, from Russia.

An additional $30 million in humanitarian assistance will focus on protecting displaced women and children and addressing food shortages.

Australian Council for International Development CEO Marc Purcell said NGOs would work with government on delivering the assistance through the Australian Humanitarian Partnership.

"This is a critical intervention for the Ukrainian people in their hour of need and a demonstration of solidarity with their plight," he said.

The aid announcement comes after China's Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng warned against the unimaginable consequences of forcing a major nuclear power "into a corner".

Mr Le told a Beijing security forum on Saturday the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation should also avoid expanding further towards Russia.

He said the sanctions against the country are "getting more and more outrageous" and will only harm ordinary citizens and the global economy.

"History has proven time and again that sanctions cannot solve problems," Mr Le said.

Australia is not a member of NATO but allies including the United States and United Kingdom are.
69
Views

Police are investigating the discovery of two bodies in Gordonbrook Dam in Queensland's South Burnett region.

PerthNow wrote the post • 0 comments • 69 views • 2022-03-20 16:10 • added this tag no more than 24h

Police are investigating the discovery of two bodies in Gordonbrook Dam in Queensland's South Burnett region.

A kayaker raised the alarm at about 3.30pm on Saturday after seeing the bodies floating around five metres from the shore of the dam, which lies about 235km northwest of Brisbane.

A crime scene has been declared and emergency services have retrieved the bodies.

Detectives at Kingaroy and Murgon are working to establish the identities of the pair and the circumstances of their deaths. view all
Police are investigating the discovery of two bodies in Gordonbrook Dam in Queensland's South Burnett region.

A kayaker raised the alarm at about 3.30pm on Saturday after seeing the bodies floating around five metres from the shore of the dam, which lies about 235km northwest of Brisbane.

A crime scene has been declared and emergency services have retrieved the bodies.

Detectives at Kingaroy and Murgon are working to establish the identities of the pair and the circumstances of their deaths.
85
Views

Health Minister Greg Hunt is optimistic about the future of the pandemic in Australia, saying the country's response to COVID-19 has beaten expectations.

PerthNow wrote the post • 0 comments • 85 views • 2022-03-20 16:07 • added this tag no more than 24h

Health Minister Greg Hunt is optimistic about the future of the pandemic in Australia, saying the country's response to COVID-19 has beaten expectations.

The nation on Sunday recorded seven virus deaths and more than 40,400 new cases, while almost 2100 patients were in hospital with 102 in intensive care and 21 on ventilation, according to state and territory figures.

Mr Hunt, who's retiring at the upcoming federal election, believes Australia remains in an enviable position globally.

"We are a stronger and a better country than many acknowledge," he told Sky News on Sunday.

"The resilience of Australians, the fact that we have had one of the lowest rates of loss of life in the world, one of the highest vaccination rates."

Mr Hunt said the federal government, the general population and thousands of nurses, doctors, pathologists and health sector workers had helped the country bounce back from COVID-19.

He said his one regret about the pandemic was not spending more time with his family.

"I've never been as good a dad as I would have liked to have been," Mr Hunt said.

"You try to be present, but even when you're there in person you may not be fully present because of the demands of the role, which is what you sign up for.

"But having said that, I leave optimistic about Australia."

His comments come after the COVID-19 outbreak intensified ramping at hospitals, particularly in NSW, South Australia, Victoria and Queensland.

Paramedics are planning industrial action against the NSW government on Monday by refusing to leave their posts to fill gaps at other ambulance stations.

The 24-hour action on Monday is part of ongoing union efforts to improve emergency responder staffing and pay.

"We're taking action to demand a better resourced service. We want a fairer workplace for Paramedics, and improved coverage and care for our communities," Australian Paramedics Association NSW president Chris Kastelan said in a statement on Sunday.

The union is pushing for an additional 1500 paramedics that it says are needed to turn around deteriorating ambulance response times across the state.

It also wants a pandemic payment, and a pay rise of more than 2.5 per cent.

Meanwhile in South Australia, a new Labor government has been elected partly after pledging to cut ramping times.

Incoming premier Peter Malinaukas will soon meet senior health officials and Police Commissioner Grant Stevens to discuss the state's health advice after winning the election on Saturday.

He also intends to amend SA's laws that impose restrictions and other measures including mask mandates, lockdowns and density limits.

"The act is not fit for purpose for a global pandemic that lasts for two years," Mr Malinaukas said.

In Victoria, the state government will offer subsidised and free TAFE courses to people looking to work in health care and other in-demand jobs.

Premier Daniel Andrews said the pandemic had highlighted the importance of skilling for the healthcare sector, as well as causing many people to reconsider their careers.

"If you want a job that really matters then now is the time to make a change," he said on Sunday.

The 10,000 extra TAFE places announced will cost about $61.6 million and won't be limited to healthcare courses. view all
Health Minister Greg Hunt is optimistic about the future of the pandemic in Australia, saying the country's response to COVID-19 has beaten expectations.

The nation on Sunday recorded seven virus deaths and more than 40,400 new cases, while almost 2100 patients were in hospital with 102 in intensive care and 21 on ventilation, according to state and territory figures.

Mr Hunt, who's retiring at the upcoming federal election, believes Australia remains in an enviable position globally.

"We are a stronger and a better country than many acknowledge," he told Sky News on Sunday.

"The resilience of Australians, the fact that we have had one of the lowest rates of loss of life in the world, one of the highest vaccination rates."

Mr Hunt said the federal government, the general population and thousands of nurses, doctors, pathologists and health sector workers had helped the country bounce back from COVID-19.

He said his one regret about the pandemic was not spending more time with his family.

"I've never been as good a dad as I would have liked to have been," Mr Hunt said.

"You try to be present, but even when you're there in person you may not be fully present because of the demands of the role, which is what you sign up for.

"But having said that, I leave optimistic about Australia."

His comments come after the COVID-19 outbreak intensified ramping at hospitals, particularly in NSW, South Australia, Victoria and Queensland.

Paramedics are planning industrial action against the NSW government on Monday by refusing to leave their posts to fill gaps at other ambulance stations.

The 24-hour action on Monday is part of ongoing union efforts to improve emergency responder staffing and pay.

"We're taking action to demand a better resourced service. We want a fairer workplace for Paramedics, and improved coverage and care for our communities," Australian Paramedics Association NSW president Chris Kastelan said in a statement on Sunday.

The union is pushing for an additional 1500 paramedics that it says are needed to turn around deteriorating ambulance response times across the state.

It also wants a pandemic payment, and a pay rise of more than 2.5 per cent.

Meanwhile in South Australia, a new Labor government has been elected partly after pledging to cut ramping times.

Incoming premier Peter Malinaukas will soon meet senior health officials and Police Commissioner Grant Stevens to discuss the state's health advice after winning the election on Saturday.

He also intends to amend SA's laws that impose restrictions and other measures including mask mandates, lockdowns and density limits.

"The act is not fit for purpose for a global pandemic that lasts for two years," Mr Malinaukas said.

In Victoria, the state government will offer subsidised and free TAFE courses to people looking to work in health care and other in-demand jobs.

Premier Daniel Andrews said the pandemic had highlighted the importance of skilling for the healthcare sector, as well as causing many people to reconsider their careers.

"If you want a job that really matters then now is the time to make a change," he said on Sunday.

The 10,000 extra TAFE places announced will cost about $61.6 million and won't be limited to healthcare courses.
68
Views

Scientists want to help Australia tap into a $90 billion global "circular economy" by finding new ways to recycle and reuse plastics.

PerthNow wrote the post • 0 comments • 68 views • 2022-03-20 16:05 • added this tag no more than 24h

Scientists want to help Australia tap into a $90 billion global "circular economy" by finding new ways to recycle and reuse plastics.

CSIRO is aiming to cut Australia's plastic waste by 80 per cent by 2030 and build up a plastic alternatives industry while ending the importation of plastics.

The new mission involves a $50 million cash splash and will see CSIRO scientists work with other academic institutions and the government.

Scientists also hope to harness nature to help tackle waste by researching how meal worms eat plastic and synthetic materials derived from seaweed.

"Our mission will be the national catalyst for systematic change to tackle plastic pollution," mission lead Dr Deborah Lau said.

"It will drive a significant coordinated response across the innovation sector and bring science and technology to the forefront to help deliver a myriad of solutions to end plastic waste."

Australians use one million tonnes of single use plastic each year and only 12 per cent of that is recycled.

Three-quarters of plastic waste along Australia's coastline is single use plastics.

Some of the things researchers have already helped develop includes a real-time monitoring system of stormwater drains allowing workers to detect when too much rubbish has built up in a waste trap.

CSIRO will also partner with Murdoch University researchers under a new innovation hub, which is already looking at developing compostable bottles, caps and wrappers.

"Some bioplastics are already in the market but most need UV light to breakdown," university researcher Professor Daniel Murphy said.

"Our compostable bioplastics will breakdown in compost, landfill or in water, without leaving a trace."

Global demand for plastics is expected to double by 2040 with the plastic waste industry already valued at about $117 billion. view all
Scientists want to help Australia tap into a $90 billion global "circular economy" by finding new ways to recycle and reuse plastics.

CSIRO is aiming to cut Australia's plastic waste by 80 per cent by 2030 and build up a plastic alternatives industry while ending the importation of plastics.

The new mission involves a $50 million cash splash and will see CSIRO scientists work with other academic institutions and the government.

Scientists also hope to harness nature to help tackle waste by researching how meal worms eat plastic and synthetic materials derived from seaweed.

"Our mission will be the national catalyst for systematic change to tackle plastic pollution," mission lead Dr Deborah Lau said.

"It will drive a significant coordinated response across the innovation sector and bring science and technology to the forefront to help deliver a myriad of solutions to end plastic waste."

Australians use one million tonnes of single use plastic each year and only 12 per cent of that is recycled.

Three-quarters of plastic waste along Australia's coastline is single use plastics.

Some of the things researchers have already helped develop includes a real-time monitoring system of stormwater drains allowing workers to detect when too much rubbish has built up in a waste trap.

CSIRO will also partner with Murdoch University researchers under a new innovation hub, which is already looking at developing compostable bottles, caps and wrappers.

"Some bioplastics are already in the market but most need UV light to breakdown," university researcher Professor Daniel Murphy said.

"Our compostable bioplastics will breakdown in compost, landfill or in water, without leaving a trace."

Global demand for plastics is expected to double by 2040 with the plastic waste industry already valued at about $117 billion.
69
Views

Canberrans are being reminded to avoid wild mushrooms after a young child who ingested a death cap mushroom was hospitalised.

PerthNow wrote the post • 0 comments • 69 views • 2022-03-20 15:14 • added this tag no more than 24h

Canberrans are being reminded to avoid wild mushrooms after a young child who ingested a death cap mushroom was hospitalised.

Acting ACT chief health officer Dr Vanessa Johnston said the child presented to a hospital emergency department on Friday.

ACT Health could not confirm the child's condition, but Dr Johnston said it was reminder for people to be careful around wild mushrooms.

"As the name suggests, death cap mushrooms can be deadly and all parts of the mushroom are poisonous whether they have been cooked or not," she said.

"Eating wild mushrooms is just not worth the risk. Don't eat mushrooms you have found in the wild, and only purchase mushrooms from a reputable supplier."

The ACT government undertakes routine site inspections at known, high yielding sites on a weekly basis between February and June.

Death cap mushrooms were on Friday detected around Canberra and removed.

The deadly mushrooms often grow near established oak trees and can easily be mistaken for edible mushrooms.

Wild mushrooms should not be touched with bare hands, and children and animals should be kept away from them.

Anyone who finds mushrooms in their yard should wear disposable gloves to remove and dispose of them.

People should urgently attend an emergency department if they believe they've eaten a wild mushroom.

They should also take any remaining mushroom to the hospital for identification.

Symptoms of poisoning generally occur 6 to 24 hours after eating mushrooms, and include pains, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. view all
Canberrans are being reminded to avoid wild mushrooms after a young child who ingested a death cap mushroom was hospitalised.

Acting ACT chief health officer Dr Vanessa Johnston said the child presented to a hospital emergency department on Friday.

ACT Health could not confirm the child's condition, but Dr Johnston said it was reminder for people to be careful around wild mushrooms.

"As the name suggests, death cap mushrooms can be deadly and all parts of the mushroom are poisonous whether they have been cooked or not," she said.

"Eating wild mushrooms is just not worth the risk. Don't eat mushrooms you have found in the wild, and only purchase mushrooms from a reputable supplier."

The ACT government undertakes routine site inspections at known, high yielding sites on a weekly basis between February and June.

Death cap mushrooms were on Friday detected around Canberra and removed.

The deadly mushrooms often grow near established oak trees and can easily be mistaken for edible mushrooms.

Wild mushrooms should not be touched with bare hands, and children and animals should be kept away from them.

Anyone who finds mushrooms in their yard should wear disposable gloves to remove and dispose of them.

People should urgently attend an emergency department if they believe they've eaten a wild mushroom.

They should also take any remaining mushroom to the hospital for identification.

Symptoms of poisoning generally occur 6 to 24 hours after eating mushrooms, and include pains, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea.
65
Views

Australian researchers have discovered a way to transform the delivery of chemotherapy, potentially curtailing toxic side effects for thousands of cancer patients.

PerthNow wrote the post • 0 comments • 65 views • 2022-03-20 15:03 • added this tag no more than 24h

Australian researchers have discovered a way to transform the delivery of chemotherapy, potentially curtailing toxic side effects for thousands of cancer patients.

The key to the world-first find is the use of nanomedicines - drugs hidden within nanoscopic fatty membranes or liposomes - which have the ability to more accurately target tumours rather than surrounding tissue.

Scientists at the University of South Australia say the delivery of frequently used chemotherapy drug 5-FU or Fluorouracil is 100 per cent more effective when administered using an optimised liposomal formulation.

Employing a minimally invasive sampling technique known as micro-dialysis, they have been able to demonstrate the biodistribution of 5-FU in a way not possible with traditional imaging approaches.

Lead researcher and co-director at UniSA's Centre for Pharmaceutical Innovation, Professor Clive Prestidge, says the advance could alter the quality of cancer treatment across the board.

"Chemotherapy is regularly administered to treat many different types of cancers, including breast and colon cancers but one of the major setbacks of 5-FU is that it does not distribute well to tumour issues and can cause high levels of off-target damage," he said.

"As a result, many patients suffer adverse effects and can get very sick during treatment."

Prof Prestidge says liposomal formulations present great opportunities for safer, more effective medications because they prolong the retention of encapsulated drugs.

However optimising them for chemotherapy has long proved a challenge.

"Our micro-dialysis approach is the first to quantify how liposomal-specific delivery of 5-FU can reduce tumour growth with fewer toxic side effects," he said.

"It has the potential to dramatically transform many cancer treatments and deliver better outcomes for people with cancer."

With cancers accounting for almost 10 million - or one in six - fatalities worldwide, about 150,000 new cases are diagnosed in Australia annually.

Chemotherapy is regularly used to treat them, with 5-FU among the most widely used drugs.

Its side effects can include nausea and vomiting, fatigue, hair loss, diarrhoea or constipation, weight fluctuations, frequent infections and mouth sores. view all
Australian researchers have discovered a way to transform the delivery of chemotherapy, potentially curtailing toxic side effects for thousands of cancer patients.

The key to the world-first find is the use of nanomedicines - drugs hidden within nanoscopic fatty membranes or liposomes - which have the ability to more accurately target tumours rather than surrounding tissue.

Scientists at the University of South Australia say the delivery of frequently used chemotherapy drug 5-FU or Fluorouracil is 100 per cent more effective when administered using an optimised liposomal formulation.

Employing a minimally invasive sampling technique known as micro-dialysis, they have been able to demonstrate the biodistribution of 5-FU in a way not possible with traditional imaging approaches.

Lead researcher and co-director at UniSA's Centre for Pharmaceutical Innovation, Professor Clive Prestidge, says the advance could alter the quality of cancer treatment across the board.

"Chemotherapy is regularly administered to treat many different types of cancers, including breast and colon cancers but one of the major setbacks of 5-FU is that it does not distribute well to tumour issues and can cause high levels of off-target damage," he said.

"As a result, many patients suffer adverse effects and can get very sick during treatment."

Prof Prestidge says liposomal formulations present great opportunities for safer, more effective medications because they prolong the retention of encapsulated drugs.

However optimising them for chemotherapy has long proved a challenge.

"Our micro-dialysis approach is the first to quantify how liposomal-specific delivery of 5-FU can reduce tumour growth with fewer toxic side effects," he said.

"It has the potential to dramatically transform many cancer treatments and deliver better outcomes for people with cancer."

With cancers accounting for almost 10 million - or one in six - fatalities worldwide, about 150,000 new cases are diagnosed in Australia annually.

Chemotherapy is regularly used to treat them, with 5-FU among the most widely used drugs.

Its side effects can include nausea and vomiting, fatigue, hair loss, diarrhoea or constipation, weight fluctuations, frequent infections and mouth sores.